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 Friday, April 5, 2019
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One thing I’ve observed in my career is something I call the “pit of success”. People (often including me when I was younger) write quick-and-dirty software because what we’re doing is a “simple project” or “for just a couple users” or a one-off or a stopgap or a host of other diminutive descriptions.

What so often happens is that the software works well - it is successful. And months later you get a panicked phone call in the middle of the night because your simple app for a couple users that was only a stop-gap until the “real solution came online” is now failing for some users in Singapore.

You ask how it has users in Singapore, the couple users you wrote it for were in Chicago? The answer: oh, people loved it so much we rolled it out globally and it is used by a few hundred users.

OF COURSE IT FAILS, because you wrote it as a one-off (no architecture or thoughtful implementation) for a couple users. You tell them that fixing the issues requires a complete rearchitect and implementation job. And that it’ll take a team of 4 people 9 months. They are shocked, because you wrote this thing initially in 3 weeks.

This is often a career limiting move, bad news all around.

Now if you’d put a little more thought into the original architecture and implementation, perhaps using some basic separation of concerns, a little DDD or real OOD (not just using an ORM) the original system may well have scaled globally to a hundred users.

Even if you do have to enhance it to support the fact that you fell into the pit of success, at least the software is maintainable and can be enhanced without a complete rewrite.

This "pit of success" concept was one of the major drivers behind the design of CSLA .NET and the data portal. If you follow the architecture prescribed by CSLA you'll have clear separation of concerns:

  1. Interface
  2. Interface control
  3. Business logic
  4. Data access
  5. Data storage

And you'll be able to deploy your initial app as a 1- or 2-tier quick-and-easy thing for those couple users. Better yet, when that emergency call comes in the night, you can just:

  1. Stand up an app server
  2. Change configuration on all clients to use the app server

And now your quick app for a couple users is capable of global scaling for hundreds of users. No code changes. Just an app server and a configuration change.

(and that just scratches the surface - with a little more work you could stand up a Kubernetes cluster instead of just an app server and support tens of thousands of users)

So instead of a career limiting move, you are a hero. You get a raise, extra vacation, and the undying adoration of your users 😃

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