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 Tuesday, August 21, 2012

Most of the work Magenic does for our customers centers around enterprise app development. That’s another way of saying ‘line of business’ or LOB apps in most cases.

Most enterprise and LOB apps will never be placed into the Windows Store for deployment. They’ll typically be deployed from corporate servers to the devices (tablets, ultrabooks, laptops, desktops) of employees. In the mobile world this is called “side-loading”, but that’s just jargon for deploying apps without using a public store.

The Wikipedia page describing the Win8 editions is highly misleading:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windows_8_editions

If you look at the last item in the comparison grid, it appears that only Windows 8 Enterprise supports side-loading. That is entirely wrong.

The following two links provide important details:

The process for Windows RT (ARM devices) seems to be more polished than for Intel devices, and that is rather strange. But still, Intel devices can be enabled to side-load apps via domain policy or a command line script.

The important thing to understand is that you can side-load enterprise or LOB apps to all editions of Windows 8.

As I’ve said before, if you want to write Windows apps that can run on any Win8 device, you should be targeting WinRT as your development platform.

Tuesday, August 21, 2012 9:35:55 AM (Central Standard Time, UTC-06:00)  #    Disclaimer  |  Comments [3]  | 
 Wednesday, August 08, 2012

At Visual Studio Live in Redmond I gave a talk about using SkyDrive and the Windows Live services from WinRT applications.

The LivePush project is here on SkyDrive:

Wednesday, August 08, 2012 8:43:36 PM (Central Standard Time, UTC-06:00)  #    Disclaimer  |  Comments [0]  | 
 Friday, August 03, 2012

With all the new terminology and conceptual surface area that comes with Windows 8, I think it is important to have some clarity and consistency around the terms and concepts.

Here are some of the basic terms:

  • Windows 8 – the new operating system that runs in a “dual mode”: Desktop (Win32) and WinRT (Windows Runtime)
  • Desktop – the Win32 OS API that supports today’s applications in Win8 (basically Windows 7)
  • WinRT – Windows Runtime: the new OS API that supports “modern” applications
  • Windows RT – Windows 8 on ARM devices (note: Windows RT and WinRT are not the same thing)
  • Windows 8 UI style – a user experience design language often used when building WinRT applications

Windows 8 basically includes two different operating systems.

One is the “old” Win32 OS we think of today as Windows 7. This is now called Windows 8 Desktop, and is available on Windows 8 Intel tablets, laptops, and desktops. This is only partially available on ARM devices, and you should not expect to build or deploy Win32 Desktop apps to ARM devices.

The other is the new Windows Runtime (WinRT) “operating system”. This is a whole new platform for apps, and is available on all Windows 8 machines (ARM, Intel, tablet, laptop, desktop). If you want the widest reach for your apps going forward, you should be building your apps for WinRT.

Confusingly enough, “Windows 8” runs on Intel devices/computers. “Windows RT” is Windows 8 for ARM devices. The only real difference is that Windows RT won’t allow you to deploy Win32 Desktop apps. Windows RT does have a Desktop mode, but only Microsoft apps can run there. Again, if you want to build a Windows 8 app that works on all devices/computers, build the app for WinRT, because it is consistently available.

Windows 8 UI style describes a user experience design language for the look and feel of WinRT apps. This isn’t a technology, it is a set of design principles, concepts, and guidelines.

Another source of confusion is that to build a WinRT app in Visual Studio you need to create a “Windows 8 UI style” app. What makes this odd, is that this type of app is targeting WinRT, and it is entirely up to you to conform to the Windows 8 UI style guidelines as you build the app.

“Windows 8 UI style” was called “Metro style”, but Microsoft has dropped the use of the term “Metro”. I am skeptical that this new “Windows 8 UI style” term will last long-term, because it obviously makes little sense for Windows Phone 8, Xbox, Windows 9, and other future platforms that may use the same UI style. But for now, this appears to be the term Microsoft is using.

Thinking about app development now, there are several options on the Microsoft platforms.

  Technologies Platforms
Full .NET 4.5 ASP.NET, WPF, Windows Forms, WCF, WF Windows 7, Windows 8 Desktop, Windows Server 2008, Windows Server 2012
WinRT .NET 4.5 Windows 8 UI style apps Windows 8 WinRT, Windows Phone 8, rumored for next-gen Xbox
Full .NET 4 ASP.NET, WPF, Windows Forms, WCF, WF Windows 7, Windows Server 2008, Azure PaaS
Silverlight Silverlight Windows 7, Windows 8 Desktop, Windows Phone 7, Windows Phone 8
Friday, August 03, 2012 10:03:20 AM (Central Standard Time, UTC-06:00)  #    Disclaimer  |  Comments [6]  | 
 Wednesday, August 01, 2012

Check out the new logo graphics for CSLA 4 version 4.5!

Thank you to Sandra Fougerousse for creating these updated Windows 8 style logo graphics!

csla win8

For those who are wondering, I expect to put a beta of version 4.5 online shortly after August 15 (when Windows 8 and Visual Studio 2012 final bits are available). That will start the beta cycle, with a planned release of version 4.5 around the end of October (if not sooner). I’m very exited to get CSLA .NET for WinRT into the hands of app developers!

Wednesday, August 01, 2012 10:45:32 AM (Central Standard Time, UTC-06:00)  #    Disclaimer  |  Comments [2]  | 
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