Rockford Lhotka's Blog

Home | Lhotka.net | CSLA .NET

 Thursday, 05 January 2017

I was reading an HBR article about Why Being Unpredictable Is a Bad Strategy and all I could think about was the Windows 8 debacle.

Leading up to the development and release of Windows 8 Microsoft switched from an open and predictable model to a very closed and secretive model. Sure, they'd waffled back and forth in the years prior to Windows 8, but it wasn't until that point in their history that they went "entirely dark" about something as important as Windows itself.

Personally I think they were copying Apple, because at that point in time Apple was ascendant with the iPad and Microsoft was worried. The thing is, a secretive model works for Apple because nobody relies on their long-term vision for stability. Their target are consumers, who like fun stuff and care little if things break every couple years.

Microsoft's primary customer base are small, medium, and large enterprises who spend millions or billions on IT. They don't like fun, they like predictable roadmaps that minimize cost and risk. The last thing a business wants is a version of Windows that comes out of the blue and breaks all their software, or requires complete retraining of their entire user base.

Worse yet, Microsoft not only increased risk for all of its business customers with Windows 8, they totally cut off all avenues for feedback and improvement of the product until after it was released. After it was too late to address the numerous major issues with the new OS.

Fortunately Windows 10 has been a whole other story. Microsoft not only returned to their original open communication model, but they've actually became more open than they've ever been in their history. And it shows, in that the business world now has a predictable roadmap, and Windows has never been so closely shaped by real-world customer feedback.

The result is that Windows 10 adoption is proceeding at a rapid pace, and Microsoft is (very so) slowly rebuilding trust with its customers.

Thursday, 05 January 2017 16:04:55 (Central Standard Time, UTC-06:00)  #    Disclaimer
 Tuesday, 03 January 2017

We're having a conversation on Magenic's internal forum where we're discussing the current JavaScript community reaction to all these frameworks. Some people in the industry are looking at the chaos of frameworks and libraries and deciding to just write everything in vanilla js - eschewing the use of external dependencies.

And I get that, I really do. However, I'm also an advocate of using frameworks - which shouldn't be surprising coming from the author of CSLA .NET.

Many years ago I spoke at a Java conference (they were trying to expand into the .NET space too).

At lunch I listened to a conversation between some other folks at the table; they were discussing the use of Spring (which was fairly new at the time).

Their conclusion was that although Spring did a ton of useful and powerful things, it was too big/complex and so they'd rather not use it and solve all those problems themselves (the problems solved by Spring).

I see the same thing all the time with CSLA .NET. People look at it and see something that is big and complex, and thing "those problems can't be that hard to solve", so they end up rewriting (usually poorly) large parts of CSLA.

I say "usually poorly" because their job isn't to create a well-tested and reusable framework. Their job is to solve some business problem. So they solve some subset of each problem that Spring or CSLA solves in-depth, and then wonder why their resulting app is unreliable, or performs badly, or whatever.

As the author of a widely used OSS framework, my job is to create a framework that solves and abstracts away key problems that business developers would otherwise encounter. Because of this, I'm able to solve those problems in a broader and deeper way than a business developer, who's goal is to put as little effort into solving the lower level problem, because it is just a distraction from solving the actual business problem.

So yeah, I do understand that some of these frameworks, like Angular, Spring, CSLA .NET, etc. are complex, and they have their own learning curve. But they exist because they solve a bunch of lower level non-business related problems that you will otherwise have to solve yourself. And the time you spend solving those problems provides zero business value, and does ultimately add to the long-term maintenance cost of your resulting business software.

There's not a perfect answer here to be sure. But for my part, I like to think that the massive amounts of time and energy spent by framework authors to truly understand solve those hard non-business problems is time well spent, allowing business developers to be more focused on solving the problems they are actually paid to address.

Tuesday, 03 January 2017 10:53:41 (Central Standard Time, UTC-06:00)  #    Disclaimer
On this page....
Search
Archives
Feed your aggregator (RSS 2.0)
November, 2017 (2)
October, 2017 (1)
September, 2017 (3)
August, 2017 (1)
July, 2017 (1)
June, 2017 (1)
May, 2017 (1)
April, 2017 (2)
March, 2017 (1)
February, 2017 (2)
January, 2017 (2)
December, 2016 (5)
November, 2016 (2)
August, 2016 (4)
July, 2016 (2)
June, 2016 (4)
May, 2016 (3)
April, 2016 (4)
March, 2016 (1)
February, 2016 (7)
January, 2016 (4)
December, 2015 (4)
November, 2015 (2)
October, 2015 (2)
September, 2015 (3)
August, 2015 (3)
July, 2015 (2)
June, 2015 (2)
May, 2015 (1)
February, 2015 (1)
January, 2015 (1)
October, 2014 (1)
August, 2014 (2)
July, 2014 (3)
June, 2014 (4)
May, 2014 (2)
April, 2014 (6)
March, 2014 (4)
February, 2014 (4)
January, 2014 (2)
December, 2013 (3)
October, 2013 (3)
August, 2013 (5)
July, 2013 (2)
May, 2013 (3)
April, 2013 (2)
March, 2013 (3)
February, 2013 (7)
January, 2013 (4)
December, 2012 (3)
November, 2012 (3)
October, 2012 (7)
September, 2012 (1)
August, 2012 (4)
July, 2012 (3)
June, 2012 (5)
May, 2012 (4)
April, 2012 (6)
March, 2012 (10)
February, 2012 (2)
January, 2012 (2)
December, 2011 (4)
November, 2011 (6)
October, 2011 (14)
September, 2011 (5)
August, 2011 (3)
June, 2011 (2)
May, 2011 (1)
April, 2011 (3)
March, 2011 (6)
February, 2011 (3)
January, 2011 (6)
December, 2010 (3)
November, 2010 (8)
October, 2010 (6)
September, 2010 (6)
August, 2010 (7)
July, 2010 (8)
June, 2010 (6)
May, 2010 (8)
April, 2010 (13)
March, 2010 (7)
February, 2010 (5)
January, 2010 (9)
December, 2009 (6)
November, 2009 (8)
October, 2009 (11)
September, 2009 (5)
August, 2009 (5)
July, 2009 (10)
June, 2009 (5)
May, 2009 (7)
April, 2009 (7)
March, 2009 (11)
February, 2009 (6)
January, 2009 (9)
December, 2008 (5)
November, 2008 (4)
October, 2008 (7)
September, 2008 (8)
August, 2008 (11)
July, 2008 (11)
June, 2008 (10)
May, 2008 (6)
April, 2008 (8)
March, 2008 (9)
February, 2008 (6)
January, 2008 (6)
December, 2007 (6)
November, 2007 (9)
October, 2007 (7)
September, 2007 (5)
August, 2007 (8)
July, 2007 (6)
June, 2007 (8)
May, 2007 (7)
April, 2007 (9)
March, 2007 (8)
February, 2007 (5)
January, 2007 (9)
December, 2006 (4)
November, 2006 (3)
October, 2006 (4)
September, 2006 (9)
August, 2006 (4)
July, 2006 (9)
June, 2006 (4)
May, 2006 (10)
April, 2006 (4)
March, 2006 (11)
February, 2006 (3)
January, 2006 (13)
December, 2005 (6)
November, 2005 (7)
October, 2005 (4)
September, 2005 (9)
August, 2005 (6)
July, 2005 (7)
June, 2005 (5)
May, 2005 (4)
April, 2005 (7)
March, 2005 (16)
February, 2005 (17)
January, 2005 (17)
December, 2004 (13)
November, 2004 (7)
October, 2004 (14)
September, 2004 (11)
August, 2004 (7)
July, 2004 (3)
June, 2004 (6)
May, 2004 (3)
April, 2004 (2)
March, 2004 (1)
February, 2004 (5)
Categories
About

Powered by: newtelligence dasBlog 2.0.7226.0

Disclaimer
The opinions expressed herein are my own personal opinions and do not represent my employer's view in any way.

© Copyright 2017, Marimer LLC

Send mail to the author(s) E-mail



Sign In